Our Vision

A people with hearts on fire, loving God, walking with Jesus and led by the Spirit

Kennington Park: St Agnes

External photo

Address

St Agnes Place
Kennington
London
SE11

Location map

Parish website

Parish Contacts

Fr Paul Ensor (Vicar)

The Vicarage
37 St Agnes Place
Kennington
London SE11 4BB

Tel: 020 7820 8050

Parish website: saintagneskenningtonpark.co.uk

Sunday Services

Monday to Friday
Morning and Evening Prayer
8am and 5pm
(No Evening Prayer on Friday)
Wednesday
Said Mass 9.30am  
(followed by Bible Study and coffee in The Vicarage)
Sunday
Morning Prayer 8am
Solemn Mass and Children’s Church 10am
Evensong (BCP) 6.30pm

Details of all Sunday and weekday services and activities may be obtained from the parish contacts

Information

Tradition: Catholic
Patron: Trustees

Population (2001 census): 4,030
Urban Priority Area: Yes

Deanery: Southwark & Newington
Archdeaconry: Southwark
Episcopal Area: Woolwich
Diocesan Record Office: London Metropolitan Archives

Introduction to parish

St Agnes, Kennington Park is a Church of England parish between Kennington and Oval in South London.We are a friendly and inclusive church worshipping in the catholic tradition 'We aim to build on foundations already laid, in witnessing to the whole community of God's love revealed in Jesus, expressed in the Catholic Faith.'

Details of Church

Internal photoBuilt: 1956
Architect: Ralph Covell
Listing: not listed

The buildings comprise a church with baptistry beneath the west gallery; north-east lady chapel; vestries and office/meeting room accessed via corridors; hall complex (with stage, lobby, toilets, kitchen, flower room and stores); all set in a small churchyard. The complex was designed by Ralph Covell, and built by Halliday and Greenwood in 1956.

The main body of the church consists of a nave and chancel under a continuous pitched roof surmounted by a fleche with north and south aisles. The hall roof is also pitched; there are areas of flat roof elsewhere.

The previous church was a G G Scott church dating from 1874-7, which was demolished after World War II following serious bomb damage. This church is described in The Buildings of England, London 2: South as "one of the noblest Gothic Revival buildings of its date, by no means a copy of anything of the past, though it is in the spirit of the C14".